Assistant Professor: TESOL

Dr. Scott Aubrey is a TESOL Assistant Professor in the Anaheim University Graduate School of Education. Scott Aubrey received his Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from the University of Auckland in 2016. He has taught at language schools and universities in Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong.  Scott’s research and teaching interests include L2 motivation, the role of inter-cultural contact (inside and outside the classroom) in language learning, task-based language teaching, and L2 writing instruction. His published work includes articles in leading journals such as TESOL Quarterly, Language Teaching Research, and The Modern Language Journal. Scott currently lives in Hong Kong and teaches courses in English language education at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. 

Dr. Hayo Reinders

Graduate School of Education Chair of Research
TESOL Professor, Graduate School of Education 

Dr. Hayo Reinders is Chair of Research and TESOL Professor for the Anaheim University Graduate School of Education. Holding a Ph.D. in Language Teaching and Learning from the University of Auckland, Dr. Reinders is also Professor of Education and Head of Department at Unitec in Auckland, New Zealand. His previous positions include Head of Learner Development at Middlesex University in London, Director of the English Language Self Access Centre at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and associate professor at RELC in Singapore. He has worked with teachers from a large number of countries worldwide and has been visiting professor in Japan, Thailand, Mexico and the Netherlands. Dr. Reinders edits the journal 'Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching' as well as a book series on ‘New Language Learning and Teaching Environments’ for Palgrave Macmillan. He is Editor of Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, and Convenor of the AILA Research Network for CALL and the Learner. Dr. Reinders' interests are in technology in education, learner autonomy, and out-of-class learning, and he is a speaker on these subjects for the Royal Society of New Zealand. His most recent books are on teacher autonomy, teaching methodologies, and second language acquisition.

Vivian Bussinguer-Khavari, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor: TESOL

Dr. Vivian Bussinguer-Khavari is a TESOL Assistant Professor in the Anaheim University Graduate School of Education. Originally from Brasilia, Brazil, she was raised bilingually, acquiring both Portuguese and English simultaneously, while attending an international school from age 3 to 18. Upon high school completion, she was granted a full scholarship by the Japanese government, offered directly by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. She took up the challenge of studying in a brand-new environment and pursued higher education in Japan. After studying the Japanese language for one year at Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, she was admitted into Kobe University, where she remained for both the undergraduate and graduate programs, completing her bachelor's degree in Communication Studies, and eventually her master's and doctoral degree in Applied Linguistics. From a very young age, she has experienced multicultural and multilingual settings and has built an interest and passion for both multiculturalism and multilingualism. She has conducted research in the field of Heritage Language Education (HLE), studying Nikkei-Brazilian immigrant families in Japan, investigating their school-aged children's linguistic development in the L1 (Portuguese) and the L2 (Japanese), as well as the parents' attitudes towards their children's language learning. Other than HLE, her research interests include TESOL, intercultural communication, Performance-Assisted Learning (PAL), Performance in Education (PIE), and immigrant language education. She is an active member of the Japan Association for Language Teachers (JALT), having been the coordinator for their Speech, Drama and Debate (SD&D) Special Interest Group (SIG), now renamed to the Performance in Education (PIE) SIG, for four years and currently serving as their program chair. She continues to reside in Japan, where she has been teaching at the university level for the past decade, and is currently an associate professor at Kwansei Gakuin University as well as a lecturer at Kobe University.

Stephen Ryan, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor: TESOL

Dr. Stephen Ryan is a TESOL Assistant Professor in the Anaheim University Graduate School of Education and a professor in the School of Culture, Media, and Society at Waseda University in Tokyo. Stephen Ryan has been involved in language education for over 25 years, and for most of that time, he has been based in Japan. His research and publications cover various aspects of psychology in language learning, including the award-winning Exploring Psychology in Language Learning and Teaching, co-authored with Marion Williams and Sarah Mercer, and The Psychology of the Language Learner Revisited, co-authored with Zoltan Dörnyei. He is also series editor for the Multilingual Matters book series Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Nottingham School of English Studies and an M.A. in Linguistics (TESOL) from the University of Surrey.

Publications

  • Ryan, S. (2020)). Individual differences and motivation. In M. Lamb, K. Csizer, A. Henry, & S. Ryan (eds.). Palgrave handbook of motivation for language learning. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Lamb, M., Csizer, K. Henry, A. & Ryan. S. (eds.). (2020) Palgrave handbook of motivation for language learning. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Ryan, S. 2019). Language learner motivation: What motivates motivation researchers? In J. W. Schwieter & A. Benali (eds.) The Cambridge handbook of language learning., pp. 409-429) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Ryan, S. & Irie, K. Learning Across Generations: A Small-Scale Initiative. In Innnovation in English Education in Japan.(pp. 97-116). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Reinders, H., Ryan, S., & Nakamura, S. (eds.) (2019) Innovation in English Education in Japan. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Ryan S., Nakamura S., Reinders H. (2019) Innovation in Japan: Looking to the Future. In: Reinders H., Ryan S., Nakamura S. (eds) Innovation in English Education in Japan, pp. 283-289). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Reinders H., Nakamura S., Ryan S. (2019) he Scope of Innovation in Japanese Language Education.. In: Reinders H., Ryan S., Nakamura S. (eds) Innovation in English Education in Japan, pp. 1-8). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Lamb, M., Csizer, K., Henry, A. & Ryan, S.(eds). (in press). Palgrave handbook of motivation for language learning. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Irie, K., Ryan, S., Mercer, S. (2018). Using Q methodology to investigate pre-service EFL teachers’ mindsets about teaching competences. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 8(3), 575-598.
  • Ryan, S. (2018). Motivation. In Richards, J. & Burns, A. (eds.). Cambridge Guide to Learning English as a Second Language. (pp. 55-62). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Ryan, S. (2017). Emotion in Language Learning. Teaching Times. 7-8.
  • Ryan, S. (2016). Quantitative and qualitative methods. In A. Linn (Ed.) Investigating English in Europe. pp, 167-73. Berlin:De Gruyter Mouton.
  • Ryan, S.. (2016). Motivation and Foreign Language Learning: From theory to practice (Review). English Language Teaching Journal 70 (2), 225-227
  • Mercer, S. & Ryan, S. (2016). Stretching the boundaries: Language learning psychology. Palgrave Communications, 2, 1-5. Ryan, S. & Mercer, S. (eds.) (2015) Psychology in language learning : Special issue. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 5(3).
  • Boo, Z., Dörnyei, Z., & Ryan, S. (2015). L2 motivation research 2005-2014: Understanding a publication surge and a changing landscape. System 55, 145-157
  • Ryan, S. & Mercer, S. (eds.) (2015) Psychology in language learning : Special issue. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 5(2).
  • Ryan, S. (2015). An interview with Tomoko Yashima. The Language Teacher, 39 (4), 17-20.
  • Ryan, S. (2015). The horse, the water, and the horse’s reflection: Understanding language learner narrative identity in the classroom. Humanising Language Teaching., 17 (4).
  • Ryan, S. & Mercer, S. (eds.) (2015) Psychology in language learning 1: Special issue. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching.
  • Williams, M., Mercer, S. & Ryan, S. (2015). Exploring psychology for language teachers. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Dörnyei. Z., & Ryan, S. (2015). The psychology of the language learner revisited. New York: Routledge.
  • Yoshijima, S. & Ryan, S. (eds.) (2015). Foreign language education: Foreign language education in the era of glocalization. Asahi Press: Tokyo.
  • Irie, K. & Ryan, S. (2015). Identifying patterns of changes in self-perception: Q Methodology. In Sage research methods cases. London: Sage Publications.
  • Irie, K. & Ryan, S. (2015). Study abroad and the dynamics of change in learner L2 self-concept. In Z. Dörnyei, P.
  • MacIntyre, & A. Henry (Eds.), Motivational dynamics in language learning (pp. 343-366). Bristol: Multilingual Matters. Ryan, S. & Irie, K. (2014). Imagined and possible self perspectives: Storied selves. In S. Mercer & M. Williams (Eds.). Multiple Perspectives on the Self in SLA (pp. 109-123). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.
  • Yoshijima, S. & Ryan, S. (eds.) (2014). Foreign language education: Roles and challenges in general education. Asahi Press: Tokyo.
  • Ryan, S. & Mercer, S. (Eds.) (2013). The role of the imagination in language learning. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching- Special Issue
  • Ryan, S. & Dörnyei, Z. (2013). The long-term evolution of language motivation and the L2 self. In A. Berndt (Ed.), Fremdsprachen in der Perspektive lebenslangen Lernens (Foreign languages in the perspective of lifelong learning) Frankfurt: Peter Lang.
  • Mercer, S. & Ryan, S. (2013). Praising to learn: Learning to praise. In M. Reitbauer, N. Campbell, S. Mercer, J. Schumm Fauster, R. Vaupetitsch (eds.) Feedback matters: Current feedback practices in the EFL classroom (pp. 21-36). Frankfurt: Peter Lang.
  • Ryan, S. (2012). Motivation. In M. Byram & A. Hu (Eds.) Routledge Encyclopedia of Language Teaching and Learning.. London: Routledge
  • Ryan, S. (2012). Theories of motivation. In M. Byram & A. Hu (Eds.) Routledge Encyclopedia of Language Teaching and Learning.. London: Routledge
  • Ryan, S. & Mercer, S. (2012). Implicit theories: Language learning mindsets. In S. Mercer, S. Ryan & M. Williams (Eds.) Psychology in Language Learning: Insights from theory and research (pp. 74-89). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Mercer, S., Ryan, S., & Williams, M. (Eds.). (2012). Psychology in Language Learning: Insights from theory and research. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Ryan, S. & Mercer, S. (2012). Language learning mindsets across cultural settings: English Learners in Austria and Japan. OnCUE Journal 6 (1), 6-22
  • Mercer, S., & Ryan, S. (2011). Advanced learners’ perceptions of effective language learning strategies: Are they ‘fit for purpose’? In In E. Schwarz, & S. Mercer (Eds.), Language Learning at the Tertiary Level (pp. 9-32). Graz: ITAT.
  • Ryan, S., & Mercer, S. (2011). Natural talent, natural acquisition and abroad: learner attributions of agency in language learning. In G. Muray, T. Lamb, & A. Gao (Eds.), Identity, Motivation and Autonomy: Exploring their links (pp. 160-176). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.
  • Ryan, S. (2011). Integrating an ELF perspective to English education in Japan: Motivational challenges and opportunities. Senshu University Annual Bulletin of the Humanities, 41
  • Mercer. S, & Ryan, S. (2010) A Mindset for EFL: Learners’ beliefs about the role of natural talent. English Language Teaching Journal 64 (4), 436-444

Natsuko Shintani,  Ph.D.

Associate Professor: TESOL

Dr. Natsuko Shintani is a TESOL Associate Professor in the Anaheim University Graduate School of Education. She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Auckland in 2011. She has worked as a language teacher in Japan and New Zealand, including in her own private language school for children. Her research interests include task-based language instruction, the role of interaction in second language acquisition and written corrective feedback. She has also worked on several meta-analysis studies of form-focused instruction. She has published widely in leading journals and is currently working on a single-authored book, The Role of Input-Based Tasks in Foreign Language Instruction for Young Learners, to be published by John Benjamins.